1. 'Zombieload' Flaw Lets Hackers Crack Almost Every Intel Chip Back to 2011. Why's It Being Downplayed?  Fortune
  2. Intel ZombieLoad Side-Channel Attack: 10 Takeaways  Threatpost
  3. Intel is fighting a battle between performance and security  PC Gamer
  4. Daily News Roundup: ZombieLoad is the Latest Threat to Intel PCs  How-To Geek
  5. 10 things in tech you need to know today  Business Insider
  6. View full coverage on Google News
Apple, Google, and others issued patches after Intel disclosed the "Zombieload" chip security flaw that lets hackers steal passwords."On a scale of 1 to 10, this is '10' serious," says one security expert.

Intel 'Zombieload' Chip Flaw Lets Hackers Steal Secrets | Fortune

'Zombieload' Flaw Lets Hackers Crack Almost Every Intel Chip Back to 2011. Why's It Being Downplayed?

'Zombieload' Flaw Lets Hackers Crack Almost Every Intel Chip Back to 2011. Why's It Being Downplayed?

The past two years have been rough on Intel CPUs—and no, I'm not talking about AMD's sudden increase in competitiveness with its Ryzen CPUs, or the repeated delays with Intel's 10nm process. I'm talking about security flaws. In early 2018, Intel and security researchers revealed two exploits, dubbed Meltdown and Spectre, that affect nearly all 'modern' Intel CPUs. And as we warned with Meltdown and Spectre, those were just the proverbial tip of the iceberg. Since then, numerous other exploits have been discovered, the latest being the MDS attacks (Microarchitectural Data Sampling, including the most recent RIDL and Fallout attacks) that again affect Intel CPUs going back as far as the first generation Core i7 parts.The good news is that patches and mitigations were largely able to address the problems. The bad news is that there was a loss in performance—sometimes minimal, sometimes not. That didn't stop the lawyers, naturally: over 32 class-action lawsuits were filed against Intel in early 2018, and I'm sure that number has increased in the following months. There's more bad news: we're going to see more 'similar' exploits during the coming years. At this point, it feels inevitable.What's the deal with all these new CPU security vulnerabilities—where do these exploits come from, and how could these sometimes severe vulnerabilities go undiscovered for so long? Not surprisingly, it's a pretty complex topic. Collectively, nearly all of the exploits are classified as side-channel attacks: they don't go after data directly, but use other methods to eventually get what they're after. It goes back to many of the fundamentals of modern CPU designs. Let's just run through some techno-babble for a moment if you'll indulge me.Why it took more than 10 years for many of these flaws to come to light.

Intel is fighting a battle between performance and security | PC Gamer

Here are 10 top takeaways from Intel's most recent class of Spectre-like speculative execution vulnerabilities, disclosed this week.Here are 10 top takeaways from Intel's most recent class of Spectre-like speculative execution vulnerabilities, disclosed this week.

Intel ZombieLoad Side-Channel Attack: 10 Takeaways | Threatpost

Last year saw the release of the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, but researchers warned that this pair of flaws was just the start of something bigger. ZombieLoad is the newest vulnerability to leverage a similar type of attack.Last year saw the release of the Spectre and Meltdown vulnerabilities, but researchers warned that this pair of flaws was just the start of something bigger. ZombieLoad is the newest vulnerability to leverage a similar type of attack.

Daily News Roundup: ZombieLoad is the Latest Threat to Intel PCs

10 things in tech you need to know today, May 15 - Business Insider

Tuesday's revelation of the existence of the "ZombieLoad" vulnerability and the subsequent patching of the issue in macOS has led some users to be angry about the potential 40% reduction in system performance for their Mac. While significant, that impact will really only impact a small percentage of Mac owners, while the vast majority of complainants are upset at something they just don't need to endure.Tuesday's revelation of the existence of the "ZombieLoad" vulnerability and the subsequent patching of the issue in macOS has led some users to be angry about the potential 40% reduction in system performance for their Mac. While significant, that impact will really only impact a small percentage of Mac owners, while the vast majority of complainants are upset at something they just don't need to endure.

Why that 40% performance hit for full 'ZombieLoad' mitigations probably won't affect you

Intel has been hit, again, by revelations of a flaw in its CPUs that allows a skilled attacker to access data they shouldn't be able to. Similar to the Spectre and Meltdown bugs that were revealed in January 2018, ZombieLoad exploits bugs in the speculative execution code running on the processors and allows a...Intel has been hit, again, by revelations of a flaw in its CPUs that allows a skilled attacker to access data they shouldn't be able to. Similar to the Spectre and Meltdown bugs that were revealed in January 2018, ZombieLoad exploits bugs in the speculative execution code running on the processors and allows a...

ZombieLoad Is Here To Infect Your PC - But Don't Panic Yet | Lifehacker Australia