1. Emirates News Agency - UAE Press: Antimicrobial resistance a global challenge  WAM EN
  2. UN, global health agencies sound alarm on drug-resistant infections; new recommendations to reduce 'staggering number' of future deaths  UN News
  3. New report calls for urgent action to avert antimicrobial resistance crisis  World Health Organization
  4. U.N. Issues Urgent Warning on the Growing Peril of Drug-Resistant Infections  The New York Times
  5. Drug-resistant diseases could kill millions unless the world takes action: report  Global News
  6. View full coverage on Google News
ABU DHABI, 30th April, 2019 (WAM) -- A UAE newspaper has said that the continuous misuse of antibiotic is posing grave risk to humanity and the world needs to wake up to the danger before it gets too late. In a groundbreaking report, the United Nations Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group on Antimicrobial Resistance has warned that if no action is taken, drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as during the 2008-2009 global...ABU DHABI, 30th April, 2019 (WAM) -- A UAE newspaper has said that the continuous misuse of antibiotic is posing grave risk to humanity and the world needs to wake up to the danger before it gets too late. In a groundbreaking report, the United Nations Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group on Antimicrobial Resistance has warned that if no action is taken, drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as during the 2008-2009 global...

Emirates News Agency - UAE Press: Antimicrobial resistance a global challenge

Urgent action is needed to address this growing threat to humankind, the report's authors say.Urgent action is needed to address this growing threat to humankind, the report's authors say.

Drug-resistant diseases could kill millions unless the world takes action: report - National | Globalnews.ca

Deaths caused by infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria will skyrocket over the next two decades, along with huge economic costs, without immediate, ambitious and coordinated action, the UN World Health Organization (WHO) and partners warned on Monday.Deaths caused by infections from antibiotic-resistant bacteria will skyrocket over the next two decades, along with huge economic costs, without immediate, ambitious and coordinated action, the UN World Health Organization (WHO) and partners warned on Monday.

UN, global health agencies sound alarm on drug-resistant infections; new recommendations to reduce ‘staggering number’ of future deaths | UN News

UN, international agencies and experts today released a groundbreaking report demanding immediate, coordinated and ambitious action to avert a potentially disastrous drug-resistance crisis. If no action is taken - warns the UN Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group on Antimicrobial Resistance who released the report – drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as the 2008-2009 global financial crisis. By 2030, antimicrobial resistance could force up to 24 million people into extreme poverty.  Currently, at least 700,000 people die each year due to drug-resistant diseases, including 230,000 people who die from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. More and more common diseases, including respiratory tract infections, sexually transmitted infections and urinary tract infections, are untreatable; lifesaving medical procedures are becoming much riskier, and our food systems are increasingly precarious.  The world is already feeling the economic and health consequences as crucial medicines become ineffective. Without investment from countries in all income brackets, future generations will face the disastrous impacts of uncontrolled antimicrobial resistance. Recognizing that human, animal, food and environmental health are closely interconnected, the report calls for a coordinated, multisectoral “One Health” approach.  It recommends countries:prioritize national action plans to scale-up financing and capacity-building efforts; put in place stronger regulatory systems and support awareness programs for responsible and prudent use of antimicrobials by professionals in human, animal and plant health;invest in ambitious research and development for new technologies to combat antimicrobial resistance;urgently phase out the use of critically important antimicrobials as growth promoters in agriculture. “Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest threats we face as a global community. This report reflects the depth and scope of the response needed to curb its rise and protect a century of progress in health,” said Ms. Amina Mohammed, UN Deputy Secretary-General and Co-Chair of the IACG. “It rightly emphasizes that there is no time to wait and I urge all stakeholders to act on its recommendations and work urgently to protect our people and planet and secure a sustainable future for all.”  The recommendations require immediate engagement across sectors, from governments and the private sector, to civil society and academia. Convened at the request of world leaders after the first ever UN High-Level Meeting on Antimicrobial Resistance in 2016, the expert group brought together partners across the UN, International organizations and individuals with expertise across human, animal and plant health, as well as the food, animal feed, trade, development and environment sectors, to formulate a blueprint for the fight against antimicrobial resistance.  This report reflects a renewed commitment to collaborative action at the global level by the World Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organization (WHO).  “The report’s recommendations recognize that antimicrobials are critical to safeguard food production, safety and trade, as well as human and animal health, and it clearly promotes responsible use across sectors,” said José Graziano da Silva, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). “Countries can foster sustainable food systems and farming practices that reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance by working together to promote viable alternatives to antimicrobial use, as laid out in the report’s recommendations.” “Antimicrobial resistance must be addressed urgently, through a One Health approach involving bold, long-term commitments from governments and other stakeholders, supported by the international organisations,” said Dr. Monique Eloit, Director General of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).“This report demonstrates the level of commitment and coordination that will be required as we face this global challenge to public health, animal health and welfare, and food security. We must all play our part in ensuring future access to and efficacy of these essential medicines.” “We are at a critical point in the fight to protect some of our most essential medicines,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization and Co-Chair of the IACG. “This report makes concrete recommendations that could save thousands of lives every year.” The report highlights the need for coordinated and intensive efforts to overcome antimicrobial resistance: a major barrier to the achievement of many of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, including universal health coverage, secure and safe food, sustainable farming systems and clean water and sanitation. Notes to the EditorRead the report in full. The September 2016 Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting on Antimicrobial Resistance (Resolution A/RES/71/3) called for the establishment of the ad-hoc Interagency Coordination Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (IACG), in consultation with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The IACG’s mandate is to provide practical guidance for approaches needed to ensure sustained effective global action to address antimicrobial resistance, and to report back to the UN Secretary-General in 2019. The IACG Secretariat is hosted by WHO, with contributions from FAO and OIE. UN, international agencies and experts today released a groundbreaking report demanding immediate, coordinated and ambitious action to avert a potentially disastrous drug-resistance crisis. If no action is taken - warns the UN Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group on Antimicrobial Resistance who released the report – drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as the 2008-2009 global financial crisis. By 2030, antimicrobial resistance could force up to 24 million people into extreme poverty.  Currently, at least 700,000 people die each year due to drug-resistant diseases, including 230,000 people who die from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. More and more common diseases, including respiratory tract infections, sexually transmitted infections and urinary tract infections, are untreatable; lifesaving medical procedures are becoming much riskier, and our food systems are increasingly precarious.  The world is already feeling the economic and health consequences as crucial medicines become ineffective. Without investment from countries in all income brackets, future generations will face the disastrous impacts of uncontrolled antimicrobial resistance. Recognizing that human, animal, food and environmental health are closely interconnected, the report calls for a coordinated, multisectoral “One Health” approach.  It recommends countries:prioritize national action plans to scale-up financing and capacity-building efforts; put in place stronger regulatory systems and support awareness programs for responsible and prudent use of antimicrobials by professionals in human, animal and plant health;invest in ambitious research and development for new technologies to combat antimicrobial resistance;urgently phase out the use of critically important antimicrobials as growth promoters in agriculture. “Antimicrobial resistance is one of the greatest threats we face as a global community. This report reflects the depth and scope of the response needed to curb its rise and protect a century of progress in health,” said Ms. Amina Mohammed, UN Deputy Secretary-General and Co-Chair of the IACG. “It rightly emphasizes that there is no time to wait and I urge all stakeholders to act on its recommendations and work urgently to protect our people and planet and secure a sustainable future for all.”  The recommendations require immediate engagement across sectors, from governments and the private sector, to civil society and academia. Convened at the request of world leaders after the first ever UN High-Level Meeting on Antimicrobial Resistance in 2016, the expert group brought together partners across the UN, International organizations and individuals with expertise across human, animal and plant health, as well as the food, animal feed, trade, development and environment sectors, to formulate a blueprint for the fight against antimicrobial resistance.  This report reflects a renewed commitment to collaborative action at the global level by the World Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organization (WHO).  “The report’s recommendations recognize that antimicrobials are critical to safeguard food production, safety and trade, as well as human and animal health, and it clearly promotes responsible use across sectors,” said José Graziano da Silva, Director-General of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). “Countries can foster sustainable food systems and farming practices that reduce the risk of antimicrobial resistance by working together to promote viable alternatives to antimicrobial use, as laid out in the report’s recommendations.” “Antimicrobial resistance must be addressed urgently, through a One Health approach involving bold, long-term commitments from governments and other stakeholders, supported by the international organisations,” said Dr. Monique Eloit, Director General of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE).“This report demonstrates the level of commitment and coordination that will be required as we face this global challenge to public health, animal health and welfare, and food security. We must all play our part in ensuring future access to and efficacy of these essential medicines.” “We are at a critical point in the fight to protect some of our most essential medicines,” said Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, Director-General of the World Health Organization and Co-Chair of the IACG. “This report makes concrete recommendations that could save thousands of lives every year.” The report highlights the need for coordinated and intensive efforts to overcome antimicrobial resistance: a major barrier to the achievement of many of the UN Sustainable Development Goals, including universal health coverage, secure and safe food, sustainable farming systems and clean water and sanitation. Notes to the EditorRead the report in full. The September 2016 Political Declaration of the High-level Meeting on Antimicrobial Resistance (Resolution A/RES/71/3) called for the establishment of the ad-hoc Interagency Coordination Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (IACG), in consultation with the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The IACG’s mandate is to provide practical guidance for approaches needed to ensure sustained effective global action to address antimicrobial resistance, and to report back to the UN Secretary-General in 2019. The IACG Secretariat is hosted by WHO, with contributions from FAO and OIE. 

New report calls for urgent action to avert antimicrobial resistance crisis

“Could antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" kill more than cancer? Doctor says to the patient: "You have an infection we've never seen before." We badly need better infection detection. Pathogen DNA + AI ⁦@ArcBioLLC⁩ #infectiondetection https://t.co/pJCYcJ0lbY”

David Sinclair, PhD AO on Twitter: "Could antibiotic-resistant "superbugs" kill more than cancer? Doctor says to the patient: "You have an infection we've never seen before." We badly need better infection detection. Pathogen DNA + AI ⁦@ArcBioLLC⁩ #infectiondetection https://t.co/pJCYcJ0lbY"

A new report says the overuse of antimicrobial drugs in humans, animals and plants is fueling resistant pathogens that could kill 10 million people annually by 2050.A new report says the overuse of antimicrobial drugs in humans, animals and plants is fueling resistant pathogens that could kill 10 million people annually by 2050.

They claim 7,00,000 lives annually, says UN reportThey claim 7,00,000 lives annually, says UN report

‘Drug-resistant diseases could kill 10 million a year by 2050’ - The Hindu

Drug-resistant diseases could cause 10 million deaths each year by 2050 and damage to the economy as catastrophic as the 2008-2009 global financial crisis, warns a new report by United Nations (UN).The report also warns that it could cause damage to the economy as catastrophic as the 2008 global financial crisis.

Antimicrobial Resistance: Drug-Resistant Diseases Could Kill 10 Million Annually by 2050, Finds UN Report

"Unless the world acts urgently, antimicrobial resistance will have disastrous impact within a generation," says new publication."Unless the world acts urgently, antimicrobial resistance will have disastrous impact within a generation," says new publication.

'Superbugs' Could Kill 10 Million Annually Without Urgent Action, Warns New Report

In view of this development, the UN Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group, IACG,  on Antimicrobial Resistance has called forIn view of this development, the UN Ad hoc Interagency Coordinating Group, IACG,  on Antimicrobial Resistance has called for

Drug-resistant diseases may kill 10m annually - Vanguard News